SALES with ASLAN Ep. 129 – Is your life out of balance? Should you join the great resignation and find a new gig?

Welcome to SALES with ASLAN, a weekly podcast hosted by ASLAN Co-founders Tom Stanfill and Tab Norris, geared at helping sales professionals and sales leaders eliminate the hard sell. At the end of the day, we believe that selling is serving. ASLAN helps sellers make the shift from a ‘typical’ sales approach, to one that makes us more influential because we embrace the truth that the customer’s receptivity is more important than your value prop or message.

The goal of these interviews is to spotlight various experts in the world of sales and sales leadership – sharing  informational stories, techniques, and expert interviews on the sales topics you care about.

 

The following are notes from Ep. 129 – Is your life out of balance? Should you join the great resignation and find a new gig?

In this episode, Tom Stanfill and Tab Norris interview Marc Lamson about the struggles we all face balancing a career while raising a family-until he found his passion, and 2 simple, life-changing tools.

 

Listen to the conversation here:

 

Or check out the full transcript:

00:13

Tom Stanfill

Welcome to another episode of sales with ASLAN. I’m your co-host Tom Stanfill, with my favorite co-host of all the co-hosts I’ve had in my life…  Mr. Tab Norris, Mr. Tab, how are you doing my friend?

 

00:30

Tab Norris

I am fantastic. Tom. It’s always a pleasure to be with you as always. I’m really excited about today.

 

00:39

Tom Stanfill

You know, Tab. I was thinking about the how is going to set up our topic of the day and I’m thinking I might need to go to training because I’m running out of super excellent. Amazing. This is one of those episodes where I need all super-low right, but I need to be believable, right?

 

00:57

Tab Norris

Yeah. You can’t push it too far. You’ve been called overly optimistic at times and maybe this is one of them.

 

01:06

Tom Stanfill

I forgot. I forgot by the way too, to mention your new title. Speaking of overly optimistic, I forgot to introduce you as the Chuck Norris of sales training, as you, gosh, you were newly dubbed on our last episode by our friend, Tyler Bergman, the who I call now, the Tom Brady of selling.

 

01:25

Tab Norris

See, there you go. I liked that. I really loved Chuck. I’ve always been a big fan of Chuck. I don’t agree with it, but I’m going to go with it. It feels good.

 

01:35

Tom Stanfill

We do have an excellent topic today. Something that I have learned a lot about from our guests and also close friends and… what do you call it? A partner, our partner ,co-owner of ASLAN. I mean, he just, he fits into so many…

 

01:56

Tab Norris

Partner, friend, confidant, mentor, great guy, fish eater, leader, champion of champions. I don’t know. We could go on and on.

 

02:06

Tom Stanfill

Going on and on, but he’s going to share something. He talked to me about five years ago, about how to have a balanced life as well as to have a more fulfilled life and work. I, that’s something, I think we all struggle with this, we’ve got a lot happening where, what is, regardless of what’s happened with the pandemic. I feel like we’re all just incredibly stretched.. Say, if you don’t have add right now, you’re not paying attention.

 

02:41

Tab Norris

That’s truly good. Actually. It’s.

 

02:47

Tom Stanfill

Funny.

 

02:49

Tab Norris

Comedians every once in a while they get it.

 

02:51

Tom Stanfill

Yeah. They’re pretty funny. Yeah. It’s like there’s so much. I mean, it’s like she got, she said it was, she said, just like I work, like I think 30 hours a week. He said, I can’t, I, she said, I can’t get it all done. You know? It’s like, there’s just so much happening. It’s hard to have a balanced life. It’s hard to keep it all straight. We got so many responsibilities. Also, how do we find more meaning in what we do in love? What we do is someone said recently to me, what sparks joy, that’s what they want most out of their career. This probably is driving what’s happening with the great resignation. We got a guest that’s going to help us to unpack that and how to accomplish those two objectives, Tab. Why don’t you introduce our guests?

 

03:31

Tab Norris

Yeah, it’s a, it is a pleasure to introduce this man. He is just an amazing quality individual that, yeah, I will say I’ve spent a lot of time with him in the last, what, 16 years, 20 years. I don’t even know when I first met you Marc, but we spent a whole lot of time together in the last several years and I’m always makes me a better person. I’m really excited for you guys to hear from him. He has an amazing background. He’s an engineer, of course, and it’s very obviously very smart, but tons of enterprise sales experience, the amazing thing is he built as a young man really came in and built and ran a $300 million sales organization.

 

04:20

Tab Norris

It’s extremely impressive what he did at the age that he was. We’re fortunate enough that he decided to come join ASLAN many years ago. It started out as a sales consultant and, but eventually became the President of ASLAN and just anything he does with excellence and he has tons to offer and we’re really excited to hear from Marc. So welcome Marc Lamson, my friend. 

 

04:46

Marc Lamson

Thank you, Tab. Thank you, Tom. As an engineer, getting started it’s about clarity and definition. I want to make sure I understand. Would we put quality individual in this purlative introduction category? Is that, is…

 

05:02

Tom Stanfill

That I don’t feel…

 

05:03

Marc Lamson

I say someone’s a quality individual with the superlatives that were…

 

05:06

Tom Stanfill

Well, I don’t know. That may not be a very good superlative  has to be the best in its category, right?

 

05:13

Marc Lamson

So…

 

05:14

Tom Stanfill

You’d be the bestest quality individual. I know bestest, let’s say that. 

 

05:19

Marc Lamson

That’s the best introduction I’ve had all day. Thanks for having me. 

 

05:27

Tom Stanfill

Yeah. I love it. Marc. Tell it, tell us, I love the fact that, because this is something, the reason Tab and I wanted Marc talking about this is because he taught us what he’s going to share with our listeners today. He taught us this. I personally applied it, so Marc, take it away from here.

 

05:43

Marc Lamson

Yeah. I’ll start where I start everything good in life about being a good person. Quality individual. Good man. Cause it’s all, I really know how to be a good man, but no surprise to anyone I’ll start with my dad, which is always where I start. 

 

06:04

Tom Stanfill

Wow, yeah start going deep. You’re going deep, man.

 

06:08

Marc Lamson

It’s a tough one to start. Let me tell you about my dad real quick. Can’t do that, but I’ll just say this. My dad was a blue collar guy. My mom and dad never, never went to college. Mom was a secretary for DuPont 42 years. That’s loyalty. I get my loyalty from my mom. 42 years, my dad went to the service, went to go do something with the helicopters, got laid off, went to DuPont, got laid off, went to the Navy yard and worked there until he retired. My dad was a blue collar guy, worked in Philadelphia. I grew up in New Jersey and I played JV football. Tom, you probably don’t know what JV football is, but kids played that the practice squad kind of varsity. They’d warm you up, that kind of thing. Yeah.

 

06:52

Tom Stanfill

Okay. Yeah. I remember hearing about that and they’d warm you up. Yep.

 

06:55

Tom Stanfill

No, I was on the ninth grade team.

 

06:58

Marc Lamson

Okay.

 

06:58

Tab Norris

Yeah. Still not JV, doesn’t count.

 

07:00

Marc Lamson

And JV. JV was, went to the games on Saturday, but what we actually played was on Mondays at 3:30 in the back of the practice field. 

 

07:13

Tom Stanfill

That’s pretty bad.

 

07:14

Marc Lamson

Yeah. Wow. And, and there was always about four people in the stands watching the JV game. One of them was my dad. Every Monday and I never asked him, how did he make that happen? How did he, how did he manage to punch a clock and build stuff? The Navy yard and be there every Monday. At the time, you’re not, you’re too cool for school. You don’t appreciate that. As you got older, you’re like, that’s pretty cool. Yeah. That’s really the, the starting point for balance in, in my life anyway, is seeing that. Just trying to be the same, just trying to do that. And, and I’m skipping way ahead, but I worked for a couple of partners that our company runs that way. That’s what it’s about. It’s about being there. We built sales meetings with both trainings around people’s schedules and what’s important and it’s just a thousand times better.

 

08:12

Marc Lamson

If that’s enough, you can hang up now. But….

 

08:19

Tom Stanfill

Yeah, you got to tell us how to do it. We, we want a balanced life. But if we’re not an engineer and we don’t have an IQ of what 95 Tab, that’s anything above 95 genius. I think that’s what…

 

08:31

Tab Norris

That’s what we’re working from.

 

08:33

Marc Lamson

You guys are above 95.

 

08:37

Tom Stanfill

Yeah. I think it’s, you take your age and divide by three.

 

08:41

Marc Lamson

Subtract. Blood pressure. 85% of that. No, the, yeah, I think there’s probably two people listening to this call. I think there’s people who are trying to figure out what their passion is. And, and I think other people that probably know what it is, and that’s not an age thing, it just comes at different places. I mean, there are people, there are six year old kids in their bedroom at the side, what they are going to be and do in life. And I think that’s just cool. I think that’s just awesome tab. Some of those people probably I’ve seen them and it is just so cool and so amazing. They are just so hell bent on that. And that just drives so many things. There’s others that have absolutely no idea what it is. I mean, you know, talk about confusion. I had the Washington Redskins and the Dallas Cowboys posters in my room, but they touching each other and, and I lived in Philadelphia.

 

09:38

Marc Lamson

I mean, I was so confused. I had no idea what to do. I’ll just say this, if you’re not sure what you want to be when you grow up, whether you’re 10, 20, 30, or older, keep looking, just keep trying just along the way, just do everything a hundred percent. Just give her, just give everything 110%. I mean, life’s about work hard and play hard. Read 212 degrees. That’s one of my favorite books. I need to read that. Yeah. Is there.

 

10:06

Tom Stanfill

A second grade? There a second favorite book out there? Mark.

 

10:09

Marc Lamson

Tease Tom. It’s been a while since I picked up a good one, but oh, and the other, on the other hand, it’s read, maybe. Book all the good books you read.

 

10:23

Tom Stanfill

It was a book you’ve read. There’s a best sales book you’ve read in the last couple of months,

 

10:27

Marc Lamson

Right? That’s true. Yes. Yes. Tabs that you keep talking. Cause you’re the books and focus. Now I can read it and I can see you got it. Just kind of slid over there to really pick it up. Yeah. You may not know what you want to be with. Do everything, while you’re trying to figure that out, do everything. That’s a hundred percent. The two 12 degrees is just boiling. Point of water. Two 11 is a lot of energy. Nothing happens at one extra degree. It’s steam and it does things. And it’s awesome. Are you really doing everything you’re doing at a hundred percent? That’s kind of rule number one, but at some point along the way, most of you listening probably have something you’re passionate about. Tom, you mentioned the great resignation. I mean, that is the balance and passion and meaning or the three things that are driving people to participate in the great resignation.

 

11:18

Marc Lamson

Whether that’s been happening for a while or whether the pandemic changed that or the move to virtual that’s for the experts to figure out. That’s probably been going on for some time. And, but I think that.

 

11:33

Tom Stanfill

I like those three balance passion and meeting.

 

11:36

Marc Lamson

That’s that’s what people are after. They’re resigning because they don’t feel like they have that. That’s, and that’s a shame and I think it’s great. I think it’s great to resign and look for something else to do that. I would say it’s. It starts with understanding what you’re passionate and what is your passion? I don’t know, but it makes you feel good. You’re excited. You love to do it. It’s it’s something you’re good at doing it’s I was watching the Olympics the other day and it was a woman who had taken some time off and she, her dad passed away and she got back onto the slopes and she skied. She said like, she forgot the feeling that it gets to be just this rush. Just, she said, it’s, you can’t explain it. It’s just my passion. You feel that whatever it is, right, it could be something that the society believes is cool and something that’s out in public.

 

12:32

Marc Lamson

It could be something I, I enjoy being on stage and speaking, what else? I enjoy spreadsheets. I enjoy spreadsheets. I’ve seen it. You’re really good at spreadsheets are cool. I mean, let’s be honest. Can we get a, can we get a yo one for the spreadsheet?

 

12:50

Tab Norris

You know that you’re the two people you’re, you’ve got on this with you all live for spreadsheets. You know?

 

12:55

Tom Stanfill

I mean, my favorite, my wife’s, we get so tired of me saying pivot table. She gets tired of the same dividends. I mean, we could create a pivot table to that.

 

13:04

Marc Lamson

What, so I guess back to me, I didn’t know what I wanted to be. I was in the camp, you’re good at math and science go be an engineer. Well, that sounds good. In the 1980s, computers are important. Be electrical engineering done. There’s my college major. What else do I need to figure out next, go to school. I hate it. I work hard. Cause my dad says never quit. Never quit, never quit. I tough it out. I manage a meager GPA and I end up doing everybody else. I made fun of him doing, which says, if you’re not good at engineering and you’re dumb, you’ll be in technical sales. That’s what I said when I was an engineer before I started looking for a job. Then, what I did, technical sales loved it, man. Awesome. Thanks to my buddy, Brent Cogswell for referring me to APC opportunity of a lifetime.

 

13:58

Marc Lamson

I went to work there on the phone, doing tech support, moved inside sales. Actually we did tech support. Actually. I wasn’t a sales guy. At first, I did tech support and along the way, I got the opportunity to be on a team, be a team leader, be a trainer mentor. People be a team manager. There was somewhere in there that was just really awesome to coach and train reps that we’d hire that were two, three years younger than me and really give them the lay of the land and really help them. They were sharp people and they would just get it. And we’d talk about what was next. We, when they got promoted, we stand up on the call center with their leather bag. We’d hand them the Laurel bag and tell stories and they’d stand up there. And it’s just awesome. I stay in touch with a lot of those people, right?

 

14:52

Marc Lamson

And that’s where I loved my job. You keep moving along this corporate ladder or corporate escalator or D escalator or whatever it’s called. You end up somewhere with the numbers that tad mentioned. You ended up with a ton of people and all these things and all these meetings and all these budgets and all this arguing and all this stress and these late hours. You realize I haven’t touched a customer or a sales rep in forever. Nothing ready? Quick, quick test for you guys. You ready to talk about passion and balance, quick test, and you’re gonna make this IQ adjusted for you guys. Okay. Here we go. What would you rather have a hot, fresh, moist home cooked meal or foil covered, dried up leftovers in the oven that’s been on for four hours. What would you rather have to eat? Hey,

 

15:45

Tab Norris

I’m going to take this one.

 

15:47

Tom Stanfill

Sorry.

 

15:49

Tab Norris

I’m going to, once you said moist, I was completely in on a, I just, how often do you get a moist meal? I don’t get them that often, but it sounds fabulous.

 

16:03

Tom Stanfill

I don’t think that was a purlative but I think it was well, it was the,

 

16:07

Marc Lamson

Okay. What would you consider here’s second question. This is only a two question quiz. So you can handle this second question. What would you consider to be leaving early from work 3:00 PM or 8:00 PM? What would you consider to be leaving early from work worthy of say, calling your wife and say, Hey honey, I’m leaving early. I’d.

 

16:30

Tab Norris

Go with three. I feel pretty good.

 

16:31

Marc Lamson

About, so right now there are a,

 

16:33

Tom Stanfill

Yeah, I’m seeing a trend here around here.

 

16:36

Marc Lamson

I put a little assessment together in a spreadsheet. You get five points for a, a negative 60 per B’s. You add up all the points on your scores and if you’re a 10, then you’re probably normal. If you’re a 50 you’re negative 50, you’re probably way the freak out of balance and your job at scores. That’s what I had adopted. I’m like, oh yeah, this is great to just.

 

17:01

Tom Stanfill

Getting home early was eight o’clock for you,

 

17:03

Tab Norris

Like leaving at eight. Is that what you’re saying?

 

17:06

Marc Lamson

Call my wife at seven 30 and say, Hey, I had my, my, what year and a half year old son and who was cool, but they’re not that interactive. I mean, at the end of the day, shows it all over the place like cheese.

 

17:31

Tom Stanfill

Let me get, let me make sure I understand where we’re going here. You, you basically, you love what you’re doing. You guys are your love where you’re working. Things are moving in the right direction, but you’re, you are working crazy hours. You’re getting home eight o’clock at night and your wealth. And.

 

17:47

Marc Lamson

I love where I’m working. I, I love what we do, but I got away from what I like to do.

 

17:54

Tom Stanfill

Okay.

 

17:55

Marc Lamson

And I got way out of balance.

 

17:58

Tab Norris

A lot of people listen, can they get that? I mean, we got a lot of lists.

 

18:03

Marc Lamson

And that’s there. It wasn’t on purpose. It wasn’t on purpose. I just did what I was asked and did the best I could. And, and you just, and I guess my boss and he didn’t really yell at me more, just, it just ended up there and I don’t know how I ended up there.

 

18:18

Tom Stanfill

Yeah. You got out of balance in somehow you, yeah, that’s a good, I think that’s a really good point. I think w I think the natural progression or the natural gravity or pressure takes us out of balance. It doesn’t take us to our family and the things that are important. If we just let, if we just let our schedule naturally develop and evolve, we’re going to get out of balance. Yeah. It doesn’t go to the right place.

 

18:44

Marc Lamson

I’m going to just introduce one of the two tools. I guess, that I think might be helpful as takeaways for people today. They’re both pretty generic tools, but somebody introduced me to the wheel of life. Around this time, the wheel of life, you can Google the wheel life. There’s a bazillion of them. They’re all Brazilian. They’re all generally rounds for the most part. Beyond that, they change but it’s a general concept, which helps you really assess and visualize how are you riding? How is your wheel, the wheel of life? Imagine that this way, take a second to explain it. The wheel of life. Imagine your unicycle that you ride on through life. It’s got some spokes things that go from the actual to the wheel, right? I don’t know, four or five, six spokes. What are they? They’re the major elements of your life. People would typically start with when we list these, it’s kind of funny people doing the same order.

 

19:40

Marc Lamson

They start with work. Everyone starts with work because you can do it as work that works first. You know, we’re at work. So.

 

19:46

Tom Stanfill

Where you spend most of your time,

 

19:47

Marc Lamson

It is right. Work, then home is typically broken up by like your family. People say family, they don’t say home. They say family. They say friends and social, and that’s maybe some different things. They look at themselves and they’ll say, your, your physical health, your mental and spiritual health. There’s some, that’s five. Maybe there’s four. Maybe there’s six, whatever. It doesn’t matter. Here’s your.

 

20:12

Tom Stanfill

Spokes, financial, right? You gotta.

 

20:14

Marc Lamson

Financial. Some people put financials.

 

20:18

Tom Stanfill

Whatever.

 

20:19

Marc Lamson

It could be. It’s, whatever’s important to you. And so here’s what you do. Go home tonight, go home tonight. Or maybe you’re home tonight and draw a wheel, draw five spokes, light pencil, and then color in the spoke, and then length of each spoke. And this is important. The length of each spoke is your level of success in that area. Well, there’s another topic. Success. What in the world success and argue about that till we’re blue in the face. I would say that it’s you achieve your goals. It’s achievement of your goals. Everybody has different goals about what work looks like and what family looks like. How many, if you have 2.4 pets and the picket fence who cares, who knows there’s no wrong answer? The number one reason why I think more people aren’t successful is because they don’t have goals. As an engineering would say, as an engineer would say, right, that the equation doesn’t work.

 

21:15

Marc Lamson

If the success is realized your goals and you don’t have goals, you can not be successful. That might be your first homework is you realize I don’t have that. I don’t have that goal. I don’t really know what that looks like.

 

21:27

Tom Stanfill

I read an interesting statistic about that and preparing for a project we had at the beginning of this year and the number of the percentage of P okay, I’ll get started with this out to you guys. What do you think the percentage of people that actually set goals.

 

21:40

Tab Norris

Like have set them or just chill, like in the habit of setting goals?

 

21:44

Tom Stanfill

The answer to the question is they set goals. So this year they set a goal.

 

21:47

Marc Lamson

8%,

 

21:48

Tab Norris

I would say 12%.

 

21:50

Tom Stanfill

You said eight mark.

 

21:51

Marc Lamson

Yeah.

 

21:52

Tom Stanfill

It’s 3%. Guess what percentage? This is just research that I just read recently. What guess what percentage actually write them down.

 

22:00

Tab Norris

Of the 3%?

 

22:02

Tom Stanfill

Well, no, just the percentage that write them down. It’s not, it’s not a subset of three, but 1%. 1% of people write down their goals for what they want to achieve. Isn’t that crazy?

 

22:13

Tab Norris

Wow.

 

22:15

Tom Stanfill

It’s hard to measure success and now you’ve just expanded it, mark the five or six areas, which I think is super important. I mean, you think about that. You have a family goal. Like if you and I, I think of it as a scale of one to five. Like it’s a five as reaching your goal. Yeah. If I had a scale of one to five, and so this is how I applied what you taught me five years ago. And I thought about my family. I said, what’s my goal for my family. How am I doing related to my goal? First, I requires me to set a goal for my family or my friends or my health. I look at myself in those areas.

 

22:53

Marc Lamson

One of our top reps is goal. One of his goals, his definition of success. What good looks like is he wants to be, and I’m sorry, we’re small. Who this person is for all the listeners and I’m outing him. I know, but he wants to be in an apron, baking cupcakes with his daughter in Tuesday morning on Tuesday mornings in school. That’s what he, that’s what success making money, doing his job, crushing his number, making top nation, making fortune 500 companies happy. He’s still able to have a schedule where he can go bake cupcakes on Tuesday morning. It’s.

 

23:28

Tom Stanfill

Monday. He wants to be there on Monday at three. It.

 

23:31

Marc Lamson

Is. Yep. So yeah. So take your wheel of life. If you don’t have, if you don’t know what a five is. I like your skin, your scale, Tom, one to five. If you don’t know what a five is, start there and define what a five is and then go see where you are even better. Ask, ask somebody else in your life, what they are. If you’re mad for me, it’s my wife. I’m here. Here’s here’s what, five.

 

23:55

Tab Norris

For.

 

23:56

Marc Lamson

A score.

 

23:56

Tab Norris

Now, have you ever, like, would you recommend like finding people that you respect, within an area or a spoke, maybe that you see that done it well, and as a way to kind of start defining that, if you’re that far off, what I mean? Like,

 

24:13

Marc Lamson

So I, I, I think so. I think there’s people I’ve looked at, I look, I studied people who were financially independent and balanced. I looked at several around me and I noticed they all had, this has gone back 20 years. So things have changed now. You just need to be a good YouTube and you’ll be fine. Back then, they all had two things in common. They had real estate and they had a piece of their own business period. That was, everyone had the same two things. Two goals became real estate and a piece of my own business. As God would have it, I have a piece of business with two good guys on the phone right now we on the phone, I guess we’re not the fungus, we’re on zoom. Yeah, you need some help setting those goals. You need some other people to give you analysis of where you are and then you have five dots.

 

25:08

Marc Lamson

I’ll skip the technical name for the graphing function in Excel to make that type of breath, but it draws your wheel and what, it’s not round and it’s bumpy as hell. That’s why it feels like some of our lives feel because we’re riding on a freaking ridiculous unicycle day after day after day, waiting for it to smooth out. If we pull of just very basic physics into the call, because sales would as, and in physics with Azlan kind of goes, well,

 

25:43

Tom Stanfill

We don’t have an episode where we don’t bring in physics.

 

25:46

Marc Lamson

You start to turn that wheel at that point, that extends out. Let’s say my career was a four and a half at the expense of one, my family and one my health and whatever else over time. Guess what happens to that four and a half.

 

26:03

Tom Stanfill

Wears down or.

 

26:04

Marc Lamson

Wears down. Yeah.

 

26:05

Tab Norris

Yeah. So it starts dropping really good.

 

26:09

Tom Stanfill

That was my breakthrough. I have not stopped thinking about that every time I think about scheduling a doctor’s appointment or whatever else I’m out of balance that I remember you telling me that, and what’s going to happen to the wheel. I’m going to be sidelined, not for an hour. I’m going to be sidelined for maybe two months, two weeks, a month, a week, whatever it’s, you’re going to pay the tax is how much you’re going to pay. You got to take care of your health. You got, see a better way to say it is. You gotta pay them. You gotta spend the time.

 

26:41

Marc Lamson

You get, you gotta take and you gotta take, you gotta go move some of that to some of you gotta go. You gotta go leave early for real, leave early and go work out or go to the football game or whatever it is. My dad probably could have made more money and probably could have gotten promoted more and whatever else he moonlighted Charlie. Bamer. Thank you, Charlie. Bamer if you’re out there, I know I talked to you talk to you about six months ago, I talked to all my dad’s buddies and he told my dad, they were all carpenters and they all did moonlighting. Right? You work all day, come home at night, have dinner and go build some stuff on the side. Charlie Bamer said, when your kid gets old enough to play little league, stop your moonlighting and go coach. He said, he says, it’s way better.

 

27:22

Marc Lamson

He says, I made the mistake and I don’t have a, I, I made that mistake and my dad told me that. And, and he, and that’s why he was at my games at three 30. We went on vacations and we did fine. Like, I didn’t lack for anything. So yeah. So, so figure out what you want to be, pick out what your passion is along the way. Once you get there, you’ll see it. Then, then you might get pulled along the corporate world because more and more, and the real test is your wheel of life. Look at all the elements of your wheel. Figure out what’s short, figure out what’s sticking out and just, you gotta do things to get it even out.

 

28:03

Tom Stanfill

I think the greatest takeaway of this is if you don’t balance, you’re going to pay a pretty significant price in those other areas. It’s like, if I’m out of balance at work, I’m gonna pay up. My I’m gonna pay a price with my kids. If I’m out of balance at work, I’m going to pay a price with my health. If I’m out of balance with my work and kids and help, but I’m not managing my money, I’m gonna pay a price. It’s like, it’s, it’s like that idea is so profound. It’s so simple, but I loved it. It really had an impact on me.

 

28:41

Marc Lamson

Yeah. So fortunately, I got a phone call. One day, I got a phone call. I was on my way to a red Sox game. I was taking a client that I didn’t really feel like taking, cause it wasn’t really doing what I wanted to do. He said in this voice, he said, Tom, pick it up from here. He said, putting you on the spot.

 

29:05

Tom Stanfill

I said, cheat, is this what I talked about too?

 

29:08

Marc Lamson

No, no, no. This is no, this is, I was still at APC. This is 2006.

 

29:12

Tom Stanfill

Oh, oh yeah. I said, how miserable are you?

 

29:17

Marc Lamson

You said, how are you? And that scene?

 

29:21

Tom Stanfill

I remember that.

 

29:21

Marc Lamson

Yeah. And I said, pretty miserable. Even asked me a few times pretty miserable. I’m going to the red Sox game. I have a couple of years. My life is a one point family leftovers for the 18th time. Fast forward, Tom. Thanks for reaching out. Yeah, I took them and I’m preaching to people now that are thinking about making that leap. I made a huge leap from my perceived security of corporate America job office salary, stock options, benefits, tech support, help desk people who did tech support for me,

 

30:05

Tab Norris

You have that now, maybe.

 

30:07

Marc Lamson

Office supplies and I’ll continue. But Tom said, come to our company. I said, oh my God, are you crazy? That was the riskiest at the time, but absolute positive, best decision I ever made because I was not in bounds. I really didn’t have a plan to be in balance. My criteria, which I found the other day preparing for this was I had three reasons for considering leaving as leaving APC. After you called me, Tom one was pursue my passion. Two was get work-life balance and three was continue to be around good people. We had really good people at APC. We still do, which is why I hated to leave. People who had left say, yeah, that was a mistake. I, I gotta be a good people. So all three of those things. Thanks. Balance.

 

30:59

Tom Stanfill

Passion work with good people.

 

31:02

Marc Lamson

Three, thanks to the two of you started in kingdom lane. 26 years ago, we have a company that provided me a vehicle for pursuing my passion, working with people, helping them get better, helping them be other centered, help them better salespeople, better sales leaders, better moms, dads, and just other center. People, quality individuals who just, just, it’s just good man to like have an impact on others and feel good about it and sleep at night games.

 

31:31

Tab Norris

I got a chill right there. I just really did basically assist it is so it’s so great to look back mark and think about that. I mean, I, I just remember us eating white castle in Cincinnati.

 

31:44

Marc Lamson

We expense it though. Didn’t we explain it. Well,

 

31:48

Tom Stanfill

I don’t know if that was, that seemed like that would be out of budget.

 

31:52

Tab Norris

I just remember. It just, it just seems like a lifetime ago, but just so it’s amazing to watch your journey and just now with you as a dad and a husband and your kids and how you’ve invested in them, it’s just, it’s fun to watch.

 

32:06

Tom Stanfill

So you’ve found your passion mark. Well, I think let’s talk about that. Let’s talk about, because I know people might feel stuck, right. Or they may not know how to find passion in what they’re doing. It can, what advice would you give people who are listening to us who either can find more passion in what they’re doing or evaluate? Are they even doing the right thing? I mean, because obviously that’s what’s happening. I mean, people are like something happened. It’s almost like the music stopped and everybody started looking at their wheel of life and there’s like, okay, something’s off here. Kind of like you saw something’s off. Now they’re starting to think about this. My life’s not imbalance. I’m maybe not doing what I feel called to do, or I feel good at or love or whatever. So give us some advice there.

 

33:00

Marc Lamson

Yeah. Passion is a great word. That’s, that’s definitely a superlative. That means a lot of things. I ran into my, I ran into another tool and I tried to go back and look at my notes, say, when did this start appearing in my notes? And where did this pop up? This was after the 2011 tsunami in Japan. And you know what? One of the big problems, I guess it’s not a problem, but one of the, the crazy, I guess, situations see, this is where my engineering hurts me in my English score in the sat, where it hurts me like the right word. I need to acquire somebody, but like something really cool happened after the tsunami. And, and I’ve been to Japan. I had so much respect for their culture and the way they live. There’s so much research about how long they live and how healthy they are and just this just amazing quality of life in the Japanese culture.

 

34:05

Marc Lamson

This is a, I have a little, just a quick statistic here. There was, there was $78 million of cash turned in to the local police stations in the town, the towns that were affected by the tsunami, 78 million. Billion. It was, again, there was a different number, but it’s us dollars. It’s $78 million.

 

34:34

Tom Stanfill

Wow. What shocks me.

 

34:36

Marc Lamson

Crazy was, and, and all, and 75 of it was basically returned to the rightful owner. People are like, no, I ha I lost this much money or that much money. Here’s how much it was in my drawer. In my safe. They found safes that were still like closed. People said there’s a safe. One of the safe had a million and a half dollars. It was someone’s business safe at his restaurant. And it floated away. They brought it in. They didn’t touch it. And he’s brought to the place. It’s not my money. There’s a, and so there’s an, because people are, there’s a study being done at this. People are just so I don’t need, it’s not my money. I don’t need someone else’s money. I I’m good. I have a reason for being, that’s not why I’m here. It’s just incredible. So think about what would happen.

 

35:25

Marc Lamson

I mean, I don’t want to, I love the U S but think about in our society and places in our country to be like, what would happen if $78 million just went on the ground? Like people are causing traffic jams, somebody drops a bag of donuts. Right. It’s just,

 

35:42

Tom Stanfill

Well, yeah, you look at what we’ve had. Some situations occur where, people, businesses were vulnerable. And so,

 

35:50

Marc Lamson

Yeah. It’s so I start with Japan and in that article, I continued reading and they said, it’s because of eeky guy. I K I G a, I, another thing that’s worth a Google search, not no one owns it. It’s not from somebody it’s from Japanese culture. It means reason for being, and this is where I think your wheel of life gets real or where you figure out how to sustain that, that feeling for things that you need to look. Four things, what are you, what do you love to do you really enjoy doing what things do you enjoy doing? What are you good at doing? Yeah. And what are you going to do? Doing not. What do you think you’re good at doing? What are you good at doing? I mean, three digits, you’re not a good golfer. You might think you’re good at golf, but if you’re over a hundred, you’re not a good golfer.

 

36:49

Marc Lamson

You gotta have a really strong when he said that I’m can I take it personally? What the world needs? What does the world need and what you can be paid for? Those are the four things to start making lists and thinking about it. I know that’s kind of heavy, but it’s pretty easy because they combine it like every two has kind of a, there’s, you can, there’s four circles that cross over like there.

 

37:21

Tom Stanfill

And where it all intersects.

 

37:23

Marc Lamson

That’s right. Where all four of those things intersect is eeky guy. It’s a it’s, it’s the state of, it’s a concept of reason for being it’s you’re there. And, and if I could go out on the limb and say, I love what we do. I love to go talk to people about being other centered and say, selling home is just awesome. I think I’m good at it. I mean, the customer say, yes, we score, we get scores. I get scores that are okay with disagree. We charge for helping people be other-centered, it’s some, it’s a business. So we make money doing it. Gosh, I think more than ever, the world needs to be other needs it. Yeah. I think, I think in selling and leading at home, just stopping and just giving a damn about the other person first, instead of yourself. Gosh, when those things line up, I mean, it’s pretty cool.

 

38:28

Tom Stanfill

Yeah. It’s like, you’re not working.

 

38:29

Marc Lamson

It’s like, I’m not working.

 

38:31

Tom Stanfill

Yeah. It’s like, let’s talk about the love to do thing. I think it’s real. There’s a real practical reason. It’s because I think when you love to do something, you think about it all the time. Like you think about competing against somebody, that’s doing something all the time. Because if you’re like, well, I have to do it because it’s my job. I have to do it for six or seven or eight hours or nine hours a day. Somebody else is always working on it’s like people that are good at social media are good at posting. Like, they just are constantly thinking about it, reading about it. I took my grandson out on Sunday and he’s into sneakers and he thinks about it. And he knows all about sneakers. These people that like, all they think about is sneakers and what you could buy them for what they’re worth.

 

39:19

Tom Stanfill

It’s like, that’s how they want to spend. These people are really good at it. Some people are making a fortune off. Like if I said, well, I want to get in the sneaker gig because I want to make a lot of money. They would crush me because I’d have to make myself think about what is the sneakers, ? I think there’s a real practical thing to that mark, because there is, we can’t compete with people who like to do something all the time. Like what we talked about when you’re drinking scotch, what do you do?

 

39:45

Marc Lamson

That’s right. You go to, what do you.

 

39:47

Tom Stanfill

Go to? That’s just the thing. Like,

 

39:49

Marc Lamson

It’s just where it’s, that analogy came from, you’re trained for two days, you’re catching the 6:00 PM connecting through Charlotte cake, taking that late flight home to Providence. You’re like, you’re supposed to do you have all this stuff you’re going to do. You get a couple of scotches on the way home. You’re like, I’m just going to go do this. Whatever it is that you go do or work on or read or pursue that’s your gig, man. That’s what your, that’s what you love. That’s what you love to do. And I think it’s important, Tom. There are sneakers. What’s your refresh. Richard referring to, I think, is like buying sneakers when Nike drops them and put selling them on stock X for a profit.

 

40:28

Tom Stanfill

Exactly. All the Wiki.

 

40:29

Marc Lamson

Guy. That’s the guy managing,

 

40:32

Tom Stanfill

Keeping up with brands and all that.

 

40:34

Marc Lamson

Good at it. Yeah. They can be paid for it and let’s face it. The world needs more of the old air Jordans coming out. Yeah. My son’s buddies brand new car would tell you that because that’s how he bought it. Exactly that. Yeah. So,

 

40:49

Tom Stanfill

We get, and we want to jump on the wave. That’s where we get confused. We’re like, okay, this is things happen. People I’ve learned about IPI or lippy or whatever. This guy is making $20 million from doing kids shows on YouTube. I’ll I’ll do that. You know? Well, he probably, he just loves to do that. These people that are, do whatever they’re doing on YouTube. I can’t jump into that because I don’t love it. I mean, they, people that are in the, into that and are good at it are doing it. Whether they’d make money or not, they just love it.

 

41:18

Marc Lamson

Well, if they get into this balance and eeky guy thing that the, the other piece I would say, and you brought this up, the other piece I would say about the wheel of life is pursuing your goals. This is the other problem that I think happens in society. When, when you don’t have goals, we grab other people’s goals. Yeah. They come from societal norms. They come from what you’re supposed to do. You look around and says, that’s really cool. I’m going to set my goal for that. John lead’s worth John lead’s worth. I talked to him not too long ago. I do my best to reach out to people and just thank them. He was in a class in 1994 that APC paid for us to go through it as a team leader of something. He said, the first thing you should do in your career, he says is make a dream list.

 

42:10

Marc Lamson

Things that you want to do. B C experience have no regard for the two resources, time or money. Just write them down every so often. Look at them, add some, subtract, some, check some off. I still have that dream list. I’ve checked some things off and it is really cool. I’ve erased some things and I’ve added things and it is the most awesome thing. And they’re mine. And that’s it. And, and, and what are the allows you for, to do is to be genuinely happy when other people reach their dreams and just freaking crush it. I mean, they just crush it.

 

42:53

Tab Norris

Yeah. I love it. I it’s so good. I don’t, I just remember Marc, when you took a sabbatical and I, this is what I remember really getting connected to this. When you came back from that sabbatical, you preach this a lot stronger than I’ve ever, I think you’ve probably known this for a long time, but I’m telling I saw it. You seem like a different person to me in any background, any comment on that, or was that true? Or give him, give us a little more about that.

 

43:30

Marc Lamson

Yeah, a lot. I think the short answer is I found, I got reconnected with my passion. It was, we’ve talked about passion, right? That’s part of your he guy, but there’s a lot of other things drill the just lucky guy and look at it. I’m not going to try to explain it, but where other things intersect, like what you love to do and what you’re good at, that’s your passion? My passion is fishing, being on a boat and fishing right on my boat, gone tuna fishing with kids and catching fish. It’s a passion. You can’t get paid for it. In fact, it’s the opposite. It kind of costs money,

 

44:03

Tab Norris

Right? That’s.

 

44:04

Marc Lamson

The world does it? The world doesn’t need any more mediocre fishermen. Those two things around, it’s not easy guy. I can’t build my life around it, but for sure, it’s my passion because what I love is, and I’m good at it. And that’s what I realized. That’s, I think the last message or the last advice aid to give advice. The last thing I feel strongly about is don’t wait until everything’s perfect. Yeah. My biggest regret, this is my biggest regret in my life. You guys know this, I’ve said this, but, and I’m lucky. I’m lucky that this is my regret. I don’t have a regret that people may not see this as a regret. But to me, it is my dad. I talked about forever me buying some sport fishing boats that we could go to an efficient, we talked about it. We looked at them on the internet.

 

44:53

Marc Lamson

We’re going to go buy it in Florida or buy Lauderdale, run it up to Rhode Island, work on it, fish on it, fix stuff, break stuff. Yeah. We’re going to do that. I got my dumb ass spreadsheet out, figuring out when I shouldn’t do it and how long and what I should spend. And it didn’t all line up. And so I waited and waited. My dad got cancer and died with no boat,

 

45:17

Tom Stanfill

Like.

 

45:17

Marc Lamson

A full. And so that’s my biggest regret. I decided right then on his deathbed, then I’m going to go do that. Even if it doesn’t make sense. It’s been the best thing I’ve ever done that experience with my family and my friends, kids. And it’s just freaking awesome. 

 

45:35

Tom Stanfill

That’s awesome.

 

45:36

Marc Lamson

Whatever it is that you’re waiting on. Don’t.

 

45:39

Tab Norris

Marc, you have no idea how many times you’ve inspired me. You just do that so well, you work hard and you play hard and it’s inspiring.

 

45:49

Tom Stanfill

That’s one of the great things about the wheel to bringing it back to that is it forces you to see your life in totality. It’s like, because we can get so locked in to one stream, one mindset because of all the pressures at work and I’m guilty of this. Like you get out of that room and you go into other rooms and you’re like, oh wait, that’s not that big a deal. Or that’s not as important as I think is so what, and I move into this other room, but if I never leave that room or I never measure the things I need to measure or focus on those things, you’ll miss it question for you guys, both. I thought this is how do you’re good at something? Because when you first move into a new direction, like maybe you want to be a speaker or, you want to leverage what you’ve learned in sales and say, I want to go into speaking or I want to be an entrepreneur, or I want to go do something that maybe out of, my comfort zone.

 

46:49

Tom Stanfill

I’m probably going to fail at first. Right. If, especially it’s something where I feel like I’ve got the seeds of greatness there. I think I could be good at, but I haven’t, first time you play tennis, it’s not going to go well, ? How do you, any advice you have for people from a career perspective on how to figure out, are you good at it? I’ve got some thoughts, but I wanted to see what you guys,

 

47:14

Tab Norris

That’s a good question.

 

47:16

Marc Lamson

I, I was thinking while you’re asking, I think one indicator is people ask for your help in that area.

 

47:27

Tab Norris

That’s.

 

47:27

Marc Lamson

Good. For example, I have never, ever had someone said, can you help me design the interior of my home? Or they’ve never said, Hey, can you meet some input on my wardrobe? None of those things. That’s.

 

47:49

Tom Stanfill

A really good point. Yeah.

 

47:51

Marc Lamson

Never asked me, but they asked me a couple of my buddies call me. They need help around there. I’m a handyman. My dad was a handyman I’m my dad. I’m my dad. I’m Leon lamps. That’s who I am, which is my hero. And that’s correct. He was good at fixing things. My buddies call me and say, this happened, they’re FaceTiming. I mean, they’re showing me, I’m like, and that’s fun.

 

48:14

Tom Stanfill

It’s true. Yeah. Yeah. One thing that I’ve I have noticed is when you think about your best at bat, do you use a sports analogy? You may not always do it, but if you think, is there a time where you were like, you really came alive and you go, if I could take that performance or that situation, or when I did it that time, you could see the natural talent and you can build on that and then ask somebody that you really trust. I say, really trust, not your mom or your dad. Maybe you really, maybe they’ll give you honest feedback. I think in American idol, everybody’s like, oh, you’re a wonderful singer. They can’t carry a tune, but somebody who can basically hear you sing and go, I think you, I think there’s something there. Keep going. Get feedback and kind of think about your best.

 

49:08

Tom Stanfill

Cause sometimes we totally blow it. Like, like I remember when I was trying to learn how to speak in public and I had a lot of fear and I, I, I failed a lot, but I could, there were times where I would do it and I go, that really went well. Like that was my best at bat. And it worked out well. I think I’ve got something here and then I would get feedback from people. And, and so I continue down this path, but I gotta be open for someone to say, Nope. Again, maybe one person tells you that ignore them. I used to tell my kids, if, if one person tells you’re a horse, ignore the three people, tell your horse by a saddle.

 

49:45

Tab Norris

Yeah. Right, right. Yeah. Yeah. I was going to say something very similar, which was seek real feedback. I mean, it’s the same thing you’re saying, but I mean, that’s the only way I’ve been able to work through things, you just, do you see anything? I mean, just someone that, that can really watch you and see if you have potential. Yeah. I just don’t know how well it should do it. I mean, you gotta get out there. You gotta give it a run. I mean, fail, you know,

 

50:16

Tom Stanfill

I think a big, that’s a great point. I think failing is part of it. Nice that I, for me, I’ll tell you for me, what keeps me from achy guy or a life is money. In other words, if I’m trying to line up my talents and passions, what will make me the most amount of money or it, or I’m looking at what, how I can make the most amount of money and that can drive my balance. When I let that go and I say, let’s just say money was not, it doesn’t matter. Let’s say I got $20 million in the bank account and I don’t need any more money or just take somehow take money out of the question. What would I do? Things start to get a little clearer.

 

51:01

Tab Norris

It just reminds me, you helped me do that early. When we met, when we first started working together, I had to make the decision. You probably don’t remember this. It just hit me. I w I joined Tom, he had this company, but this is before we started as list as long time ago. I was going to sell the service that he did. Cause I came from sales and obviously I’d been in sales and love sales, and I was all excited about it. Well, somehow I stumbled into kind of a, managing a group of people. I started helping develop these people on our team, just as part of my development before I was going to go out and sell this. Well, I liked it. I kind of thought maybe I was good at it, but I didn’t really know I was young and dumb, but I was people seem to like me developing them.

 

51:50

Tab Norris

And, but I went tom and I said, I’ve got a dilemma here to, could I change gears and kind of do the whole management slash training development track. He’s like, yeah, you can make a whole lot less money. If that’s what your passion is, if that’s what you think you’d rather do, and you think you’re going to better, you will. You said this time, you will end up making more money following your passion than if you just do something to make more money now. And so I made that choice. I took a cut in pay to go this route and I am extremely grateful. Okay.

 

52:26

Tom Stanfill

Yeah. It’s so easy to learn that lie. Easy to say that and learn that lesson. When you look at other people like I’ve had, I’ve seen people like go in sales because they’re like, that’s how you make money and have the best schedule, but they’re accountants and they really are brilliant accountants, but they just don’t like that. They don’t want to be an accountant. And so they fight against that grain. Yeah. We probably, we probably.

 

52:50

Tab Norris

Need to wrap it up.

 

52:51

Tom Stanfill

Marc. Any, any takeaways, reflections, any questions to ask ourselves as we apply this to kind of tie it all together?

 

52:59

Marc Lamson

Yeah. I would just say a couple of reflections and just, I guess the last, the last point I would make a couple of reflections are, start with, I think to start with your wheel. If you want to make this tactical start with your wheel, the pitcher we’ll build a wheel. What are the elements? Work, home work, family, friends, or social, spiritual, physical health, four to six spokes. Let’s five look like, what’s good. Look like, talk about that. Figure that out, write that down. Look at your dream list. Start a dream list, do it with your spouse, do it with somebody close to you, someone you trust and see where you are and draw that out. I love that. Just start moving some stuff around. Something’s kind of low. You got it. You got to work harder on it. If you don’t have time, you gotta take it from somewhere.

 

53:46

Marc Lamson

You gotta leave before eight o’clock at night or whatever. So look at your wheel. Eeky guy is really about that career, that work piece, like if you can build the more time you can spend in eeky guy and it gets a little blurry, when you’re at work or when you’re at home, but the more you’re doing what you love, that you’re good at, you need to make some money for what the world needs. And, Tom, we talk about, I mean the three of us talk about our, our goal, feeding the family and, we get paid for sales training to, to help people be other centered, to give, to, helping feed the family to help parents and brothers and sisters be other centered and fix the family element of things. Some things you get paid for and some things you don’t work and what the world needs, but those are all I get confused, whether we’re doing that or trainings, when how to sell more, it’s the same passion and fun.

 

54:43

Marc Lamson

Look at your wheel, draw your wheel, make those changes live in your eeky guy. And, and day to day and day to day, I’m just going to close with a, I’m just gonna close with our, with our other centered model. I think it’s been a while since we’ve maybe really taught this, the side decide, choose, serve, seek. It’s just, I just been thinking about this on this call actually, as we’ve been sitting here talking, and so this might be not very organized, but I just wanted to say thank you to both of you for both of you SUpporting me coming here 20, not 2006, 15 years ago, 10 years ago, giving me the opportunity to come here. It’s been an awesome decision, ups and downs, for sure. But it’s just so great and fulfilling. That’s so proud of what we do. It came here from a passion, for sure.

 

55:49

Marc Lamson

I’ve, I’ve been able to pursue my passion every day, since then, balance yes. Balance and just working with, with people that Tom, your genius, your ability to break down people’s receptivity and ability to be influenced. We teach people how to sell, but what’s even more important is teaching people how to have a relationship with her with the most unreceptive audience at all. Those are, teenage kids and, those kinds things, this side to serve, seek them. You’ve, you’ve taught me that the side that I’m going to serve others, right choose. One of the most valuable things you’ve ever done for me was teach me to choose or said differently is cheap because when it comes to your wheel, when it comes to icky guy, you just can’t do it all. Sometimes I don’t give a crap. If county can fit it in or all that stuff, can’t do it all.

 

56:53

Marc Lamson

When you’re supposed to be at Azlan and flat on the ass, on the client calls, you’re supposed to be at Azlan and decline, and your dad’s died of cancer. You’ve kind of been swinging by his place in Philly every time when the end of a business trip. But, because ASLAN, and that’s important because you’re president of, big company and, and you got to go see a client. Cause you got to go tell them to be other centered. Well, I got it. You got to do that. I should call my dad and say, dad, we’ll be a little late. We kind of maybe switch this trip up and catch you next time. Tom stamp, you said do not cheat on your dad. Cheat on Azlan. Yep. I skipped as when I went to the client left early, got home with my, dad’s been a few quality days with him.

 

57:34

Marc Lamson

That was the middle of May, 2015 went home. A week later, my mom called me and said, your dad is taking a turn for the worst. I went home and I never had another that time. I cheated with my time, I cheated on ASLAN when the place we work, the company you’ve built place, we serve, I got a chance to go hang out with my dad for what I didn’t know is my last normal regular conversation with a beer, cut grass, drank beers and hang out and talk. That’s cool. Awesome. Thank you. Oh man.

 

58:09

Tab Norris

Just to make us cry. Right?

 

58:12

Marc Lamson

We decide when we decide who we’re serving…  hanging out with my dad, doing stuff and listening to Elvis and washing his car and then seek, Tab. You said a mouthful, you said to seek feedback from others and you were one of the most, one of the best seek conversations I’ve ever had. I remember this conversation, we were in the hot tub. I think that needs some clarity.

 

58:38

Tab Norris

That definitely needs clarification.

 

58:41

Marc Lamson

After a Braves game, went out, had a couple of beers. I was a year in to ASLAN. It was tough. I’m not gonna lie. It was a tough, it was a tough deal selling what we sell. I’ve had success at APC. I, I thought I was done. I was playing, scratch golf, but I was really not quite breaking a hundred. So, but I, I looked good and I had nice clubs. And, and I said, do you Tab who is the world’s absolute positive, best, most effective, most Other-Centered coach, not sales coach, just coach period in the world. Your ability to give feedback in a way for lots of superheroes, right? Never, never gets people upset and just is so true. I decided I’d asked you cause Tabs, nice. Hey Tab, how you think I’m doing get ready to take a sip of my cold bourbon.

 

59:35

Marc Lamson

Get ready to tell me I also my end. You said you fill in that blank Tab. You said,

 

59:42

Tab Norris

I think I said, I’m disappointed.

 

59:44

Marc Lamson

You said, I’m disappointed. The exact words you use. I hear them all the time. The best thing I could have ever heard. What I didn’t realize I was disappointed too. So you gotta seek. When you seek, you have to be ready for what you get and you can’t defend it. You just have to take it and say a new, do something about it,

 

01:00:02

Tab Norris

Which is amazing the way you handled that speaks very loudly.

 

01:00:06

Marc Lamson

So, so anyway, I just wanted to say thanks for having me here for just building a platform that I, that an engineer can be can just pick up. Cause I can’t build other centered. I can build those cool things and those cool words. I definitely can’t design any slides,

 

01:00:25

Tab Norris

Well, thank you Marc.

 

01:00:27

Marc Lamson

I appreciate, I appreciate the opportunity to come on to SALES with ASLAN.

 

01:00:31

Tab Norris

Glad that the three of us got to do this together. Fantastic.

 

01:00:35

Tom Stanfill

So, but so many, I mean, so many, so much gold in that conversation, Marc, I’m just hearing a geek, got a double-click on it. I remember hearing Andy Stanley say that he, I think he wrote a book about choosing to cheat, which is where I got that concept. It just came, but it’s the idea that we’re all going to be sitting around and we’re going to figure out at one point in our life, what’s really important. Yeah. It’s Monday at three and we’re going to either realize that when we have time to do something about it, or we’re going to realize that too late, but it’s Monday at three and or it’s being with your dad or whatever that is. The thing that I would say as I’m listening to this it’s, this is what I’m taking away. I want to look at my schedule and compare it to my value, what I value.

 

01:01:25

Tab Norris

That’s good.

 

01:01:26

Tom Stanfill

If my schedule doesn’t align up to what I really value, I need to change something. That’s kind of my takeaway let’s have, this has been another amazing episode. You think we should invite mark back?

 

01:01:38

Tab Norris

Oh yeah. He’s coming back. He’s.

 

01:01:40

Tom Stanfill

Coming back. He needs it. We need to get him to talk about his latest and greatest venture of building the channel. I think that’s going to be, I think that’s going to be truly a new adventure and something. That’s really gonna have an impact on a lot of people. That’ll be, that’s it for another episode. If you guys enjoyed the episode, enjoyed what we’re doing, give us some feedbacks, give us some comments, let us know how we can improve or what you like so we can keep doing it. That wraps up another episode of SALES with ASLAN.

ASLAN teaches sellers an easier, better way to gain access & influence unreceptive customers, by eliminating the hard sell.

Leave a Comment





About ASLAN

The best way to get to know us is to know what we value. If we teach it we live it, because what we do speaks far more eloquently than what we say. We’ll always choose people over profits, and we’re most fulfilled and effective when we serve. It drives our culture, frames our training programs and transforms the lives of the clients we partner with.